Monthly Archives: July 2015


Does Liberation Sound Like a Bubble Bursting in Slow Motion?

You can tell that I have Greece on my mind these days. It’s also all over European media and that’s because whatever she decides regarding her financial situation sets a precedent with the EU/IMF and the European Central Bank (ECB) and its other member countries. That precedent might look a little like liberation to some who have been struggling with a bum lending situation.

You might have heard that over the weekend, the Greeks voted “No” (“Oxi” in Greek) against something. The vote was against accepting another EU/IMF loan in exchange for increased austerity measures. It seems that Germany thinks Greece should get another loan to help “stimulate” the economy and pay back her loan, continue her belt-tightening measures for another decade or so, and continue trying the restrictive measures to foster economic growth. The Greeks feel that they need to deal with their economy another, more expansive way (like by having jobs for its graduating students).

Meanwhile, the French (another strong voice in the EU) seem open to the idea of adjusting the repayment terms for the Greeks. And the Greeks would rather renegotiate their loan on more lenient terms, rather than squeeze their broken economy through a tighter belt and spend the little funds their economy has on payment installments they can’t afford.

This situation sounds all too familiar, doesn’t it? I’m sure it sounds like a lot of calls people have with their mortgage lenders and credit cards, etc. There’s a point where even the collection agencies know there isn’t anything they can do.

As I have mentioned previously, I’m no economist or financial person, but it looks like there’s a bubble. And it seems like it’s bursting… Maybe this is the sound of an economic bubble bursting in slow motion…?

Yanis Varoufakis

Greek Finance Minister, Yanis Varoufakis, open about his position on Greece’s acceptance of EU Bailout terms.

1) The lending institution recognizes that it can demand repayment all it wants, but if the borrower can’t repay, what can the lender really, really do?

2) This is the point where the lessee realizes she holds a certain amount of power, but also has some compassion. After all, when the lessee borrowed the money, she really did intend to pay it back.

3) The lender doesn’t want to be too soft, because he wants to be clear that he’s serious about getting his money back. BUT, the lender doesn’t want to be too hard either because then the lessee will give him a big, fat doughnut.

4) Still, the lender begins to insist, because he realizes that his power is based on the wealth that he no longer has (because he lent it to the lessee). He wants it back — he wants to restore the structure. Keep things the way they were.

5) The lessee slowly realizes that things are a little different. Sure, she’s broke, but when you have nothing, you have nothing to lose! This realization alone becomes empowering… She feels even a little bit more sure of herself from a deep, unshakeable core and does “crazy” things like… flipping the bird to her lender and threatening … a “Grexit”. Sounds a lot like the folks who were underwater on their mortgages and just walked away. Just left their homes and said, “that’s it”.

And that’s what this is boiling down to, isn’t it?

It’s not just about the economy. It’s about the symbol of power that money lends to nations and people. And also about people realizing that it’s a symbol — only as powerful as we make it out to be.

Now, if one of the original EU nations says “Enough”, “Basta” (or whatever the Greek word is for it) and steps out of the EU altogether, what does that say for the solidity of the concept of economic, political (and even patriotic) belonging? Might other lessees, such as Portugal or Spain, say, “Hey, we want out of this lousy loan, with lame repayment plans and austerity measures that are cramping our growth!”

A nation, a person, wanting to grow on its own terms. Sounds like a revolution.


Lesson from Greece: Money Only Has the Power We Project on to It

So last week in European media, there has been a great deal of discussion about the “Greece” Bailout. I’m not sure how much play this news is getting in the U.S., but I think it’s probably not getting as much play as it should. I am also not sure how much attention this theme is getting in “other dimensional” media (among spiritualists and those gearing up for the Ascension).

The Quick and Dirty

I am no economist, nor am I a financial specialist, but I do believe some things don’t require a degree for complete understanding. Here’s the skinny as I have understood it: the European Union (EU) gave Greece a massive loan and Greece missed its first deadline: June 30. Mind you, Greece has been warning her lenders, the EU and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), that payment wouldn’t be forthcoming. The talks leading up to the now-lapsed payment date were basically a standoff, with Greece saying she couldn’t pay and wanted an extension along with new terms and the EU (mainly Germany and France) saying, “fork it over”.

100% of Zero Euro is still Zero

The whole scene is reminiscent, not of big Summit “negotiations”, but rather a kindergarten playground argument. (“Give me back my cupcake!” countered with, “I can’t, I already ate it.”)

If the absurdity of such “negotiations” didn’t strike you last month, surely it’s beginning to show its true face now that the deadline has lapsed. Some parties are willing to discuss an extension (funny, since the extension is already now in play) and others are talking complete relief (no payment) for Greece. The whole gammut.

Could “the People” Save the Day with IndieGogo?

Then, there’s this 29-year-old in England who hatched up an IndieGoGo campaign to raise the 1.6 Bn Euro for Greece and help her make good on her loan. And he’s gotten quite a bit of press on this side of the Atlantic. The short version of his premise is basically, if every resident in the EU donated the equivalent of the price of a Greek Salad (about 7 Euro), we could raise the 1.6 Bn Euro that Greece needs to pay back the loan.

How “Small” are the Little People?

This got me thinking about the 5th Dimension concept of “fair and transparent” wealth distribution along the following points:

It takes the control and manipulation of the inter-governmental banking system out of the hands of elite politicians and puts it directly in the hands of the people.

Screenshot from the IndieGogo Campaign

Screenshot from the IndieGogo Campaign

In my opinion, for too long, “the people” have sat back and allowed the elite to “take care of” the money. But at what cost? While they may consider themselves to be free to work the jobs they want, they are still slaves to their income and the income taxes that come with it (or worse, they are slaves to the “promise of the potential to have their own income”!) — only to learn that for the taxes they have paid, the roads aren’t being paved as smoothly as they could be, the schools are implementing programs to turn children into Pavlovian automatons, and the money is not being managed as it should be, because let’s look at the evidence as demonstrated by Greece:

– Unemployment in Greece last month was as high as ever/always. Those who still have jobs and continue to live there have had to reduce their income by about 70 percent. Many have emigrated to other EU countries, and many more are considering it.
– If there are Greeks who are lucky enough to have some money in the bank, they were punished for their government’s mishandling of its funds. Banks shuttered their doors to their customers and nationwide placed a 60 Euro per day limit on their residents’ withdrawal limit.

Because — let’s consider this carefully — Greece took a loan because it needed funding to presumably pump back into her economy, so that her economy could experience a boost and raise the funds to pay back her loan. And, yet, over all these years, it seems that the benefit to the Greek people has been, well, has their really been a benefit to receiving this loan?

So, My Point Is…
Seeing the IndieGogo campaign had me thinking that this really would be an interesting solution — not so much because it would help Greek politicians save face at the EU negotiating table, but more so because I think it would embolden people — regular people — to better understand their role / our role in the world economy.

Money / Currency has only the power we attribute to it.